Supply House Times

Art Museum Toilets Showcased As Works Of Art

February 10, 2009
The world-renowned collection's first-ever special exhibition is the John Michael Kohler Arts Center.

John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Ann Agee. Images Provided by The John Michael Kohler Arts Center. Sheboygan, WI. Digital Image 1999


The Art Museum Toilet Museum of Art, the world's largest collection of images of art museum toilets taken at various art museums around the world, is proud to announce its first special exhibition: The John Michael Kohler Arts Center Washrooms. The exhibition showcases John Michael Kohler Arts Center’s unique washrooms, which epitomize the achievements of Arts/Industry, the decades-long collaboration between art and industry conceived by Director Ruth Kohler.

Started in 1974 as a means of supporting artistic exploration by providing artists with access to industrial technologies, Arts/Industry gives artists from around the world the opportunity to create new bodies of work using the facilities, technologies, and materials of the nation's leading plumbingware manufacturer, Kohler Co.

The exhibition includes images from six washrooms from the following artists:
  • The Women's Room: By Cynthia Consentino
  • The Social History of Architecture: By Matt Nolen
  • Childhood Vitreous: By Casey O'Connor
  • Sheboygan Men's Room: By Ann Agee (shown)
  • Tell Me Something I Don't Already Know: By Carter Kustera
  • Emptying and Filling: By Merrill Mason
"These washrooms are permanently installed works of art and now the whole world has the opportunity to enjoy them," said R.M. Schlemielle, director of The Art Museum Toilet Museum of Art. "They serve to uphold the Arts Center's philosophy that art can enliven, enrich, and inform every facet of our everyday lives and we are proud to offer a platform so that even more people can enjoy these works of art."

The museum's collection currently houses exclusive images ranging from the prestigious marble lavatory at the Metropolitan Museum of New York, behind-closed-doors shots of the Hermitage's latrines and the decaying (yet still flushing) pictures of the Mongolian Art Museum's commodes. Since its inception, staff members have tirelessly been collecting images from around the world and it is now believed by experts to be the world's largest collection to showcase the forgotten art that can be found in every museum.

For more information, visit www.artmuseumtoilet.org.

Source: The Art Museum Toilet Museum of Art